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Mission Statement
To facilitate the transfer of unbiased ideas and information between research institutions, industry and agricultural producers.
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Urea on Snow
January 15, 2018

Urea on Snow? Just say no

by Ron Lyseng Western Producer, January 11, 2018 The calendar says, ‘yes, do it,’ but the data says, ‘whoa’; researchers adamant that applying urea on frozen fields is a bad idea A few prairie farmers are taking advantage of fields almost barren of snow this winter to apply urea, a practice akin to spreading hundred dollar bills to frozen soil. That’s the opinion of Rigas Karamanos, senior agronomist for Koch Agronomic Services in Calgary. “This is not agronomically sound. Somebody’s telling them it’s OK, but it’s not OK,” he said. “When nitrogen fertilizer sits in snow or frozen ground, your losses can be as high as 50 percent. It’s terrible.” Karamanos said the people who are advising this practice are not being honest with their clients. “Who, you ask? It’s people who simply want to sell fertilizer, that’s all,” he said. “That’s who’s telling producers it’s OK. There’s so much… Read More
Cereal plots near High Prairie small
Dec 19, 2017

SARDA a Year in Review

The year 2017 began with an air of excitement and enthusiasm. Booth sales for the Smoky… Read More
clubroot 2
Aug 30, 2017

Clubroot confirmed in the Peace Region

by Shelleen Gerbig, P.Ag., Extension Coordinator, SARDA Quote from realagriculture… Read More
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Aug 04, 2017

Growers need to adopt sustainable farming practices to meet growing food demands: Fertilizer Canada

Global population estimated to rise to 9.7 billion by 2050 By Diego Flammini Assistant… Read More
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Jun 06, 2017

SARDA Ag Research - Responding to producers’ needs

SARDA has a busy year planned! We’re expanding our public events and research trials so… Read More
Country Guide
May 17, 2017

The Next Big Disruption in Agriculture

By Gerald Pilger Published: May 8, 2017 Crops, Guide Business, Opinion Sometimes a shock… Read More

Summer Fieldschool 2016

SARDA Ag Research is hosting our 4th annual Summer Field School and we would like you to attend!  Summer Field School is a one-day event that gathers producers and industry members together to learn more about the industry they share. We will be hosting four speakers to talk about the latest in agricultural news and will be touring our sites to show our research in action.

A $75 registration fee will cover the entire day along with a barbeque lunch and transportation to and from our sites. The day is July 13, and it starts at 8:30 a.m. at the Donnelly Sportex and ends at 3:30 p.m. It will be a day of learning and meeting new people guided by knowledgeable presenters sure to give you food for thought.

This year’s speakers and topics are:

  1. Robyne Bowness: Faba beans. Learn why you might consider growing faba beans on your farm. Robyne works as the Pulse Research Scientist with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, managing research trials on pulse crops across Alberta.
  2. Ralph Cartar: Native pollinators. Learn about the humble bumblebee and how its pollination habits can help the yield of your crops. Ralph is an associate professor at the University of Calgary who studies how foraging and life history traits of bees are linked.
  3. Jan Slaski: Industrial hemp. Learn about the possibilities of a hemp industry in Alberta. Jan has been doing research on the potential of hemp for 15 years and is the current director of the Canadian Hemp Trade Alliance. He may very well be the best person in the province to teach you.
  4. Lilianne Trudeau and Jack Wyne: Hail projects. Learn about the results of hail trials across Alberta (including trials SARDA conducted last year) and how you can help your crops succeed in spite of hail damage. Lilianne is a product specialist at the Falher AFSC, while Jack is an AFSC adjuster.

We hope to see you at our Summer Field School. You can register online at sarda.ca or by phone at 780-837-2900. Registration costs $75 and space is limited.

Click Here Register Now